Dallas Technical Jobs Blog

Blog for the Dallas IT and technical job markets. News, advice and tips for job searching, resume writing, interviewing and IT career growth in 2016.

The answer is: Both and Neither

When evaluating the key differences between new talent and experienced workers you'll find that they both offer their own benefits and drawbacks. It's important to consider the beneficial dynamic of having different kinds of people on your team and understand the issues with being too quick to choose one over the other.

Wednesday, 14 September 2016

Career Sabotage via Social Media

In truth, there are so many naturally occurring ways in which a situation can go sideways that it certainly doesn't need our help. For the most part we're focused on keeping things on track. However, every once in a while it seems like we make a special effort to sabotage ourselves.

We've all heard about the assorted teenagers that have tweeted thoughtless things about their jobs. A few of them have even made it to the mainstream media.

One young lady spoke of obtaining a job at a pizzeria and being faced with a long daily commute, and hating the work, despite the good paycheck. Another complained about how getting a job was going to "ruin her summer", and the place she was working was "colorfully described" as unpleasant.

In both cases the tweets were read by the employers that were following up on their "new hires". Neither gal got to work even one day at their new jobs.

But that's just Kids, you say…

How hard could it be?

More and more companies are turning to the telephone interview. What used to be a simple "Yes, this is Bob Smith. […] Certainly! I would be delighted to see you on Thursday at 2 p.m. […] Thanks for your call!" has turned into an integral part of the interview process.

Sometimes they call because you cannot attend the in-person interview; sometimes they call to see if you'll eliminate yourself by saying something stupid. But, in some cases, the entire interview process may be conducted by telephone, particularly if you're going to be a remote worker that never comes into the office.

Friday, 26 August 2016

Advance Your IT Skills

Lies the Internet told us

Never programmed before? Now you can learn to program in just three weeks with our home study course.  Don't wait! Don't hesitate! Start making the Big Money Now…

Some things simply aren't true

Maybe Dustin Hoffman as Rain Man could learn to program in that length of time, but certainly not ordinary citizens. It takes months to get a good grasp on programming in even the easiest languages, and years to become proficient. TANSTAAFL, as the expression goes.

Dallas IT staffing agencies easily acknowledge that programmers certainly deserve respect for investing the time and effort to learn such a complex skill. It takes a particular mind set—one that is very task-oriented—in order to be a great programmer. Often, however, it is that very skill that works to prevent you from advancing in your IT career.

If you find yourself in the southern end of the lower 48, especially if you're looking for a job in the technology staffing area, then Dallas is pretty much the place to be. Business is booming in D-town and IT staffing companies in Dallas are looking for you.

Mock Governor Rick Perry if you must, but the fact remains that his state of Texas still dominates the Top 10 List for best cities with good jobs (it has five, half of the total). Leading, as usual, is Dallas, which despite AMR's bankruptcy back in 2011 still managed to rack up more than 2% job growth last year and is looking at a 2.8% rate of growth from now through 2019.

Remember, while the rest of the country struggled with double digit unemployment rates during the 2008-2014 "economic rebalancing", Texas peaked at 8%, and is already back down to 6.2% while the rest of the country still hovers around 8% unemployment.

Friday, 12 August 2016

Your Best IT Résumé

key steps

Creating your best IT résumé is not something you should take lightly. Thinking that it doesn't matter because "They'll be begging to hire me once I talk to them" is akin to standing outside your locked house declaring "When I get inside and find my keys, I am definitely coming back out to unlock this door!"  

Wrong order, my friend, wrong order! Your résumé is your key. Unless you have some great nepotism working in your favor, you're completely stymied without a great résumé.

Thursday, 04 August 2016

Maximizing Your Tech Career

So you graduated from college…Congratulations! Did you make it by the skin of your teeth, or were you granted magna cum laude?  

It really doesn't matter because I've seen graduates who were the bane of their professor's existence become remarkable achievers. Conversely, we've all heard of so-called "Sheldon Coopers" that fell by the wayside because they were unable to cope with the real world outside of academia.

Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Getting That First Engineering Job

Back in the 12th century "engineer" referred to someone who "schemed", and it had a rather negative connotation, such as someone who would "engineer to overthrow the King". By the 14th century however it had garnered some respect as "someone who designed war machines, such as ballistae, catapults, and siege engines (e.g. battering rams with a cover to protect soldiers from arrows, rocks, boiling water/oil, or even molten lead).  

It wasn't until the 15th century when it took on something closer to the modern meaning of "inventor, designer, or creator". Then it generally referred to civic works (aqueducts, sanitation, and public buildings), so we continue to distinguish between a civil engineer, and an engineer of every other stripe, to this very day.

Wednesday, 20 July 2016

How do I find my ideal IT job?

Once upon a time there was a fellow named Keith. Ever since he'd been old enough to work he had found a job to do. He had paper routes; he shopped for some of the old ladies in his neighborhood; he cut grass and shoveled snow on sidewalks or driveways.  

He was always doing something (even if he wasn't being paid). He taught himself to draw; learned to build his own computers; apprenticed as a carpenter, plumber, electrician, and auto mechanic. He once deliberately spent a whole year with a new job every week. Eventually, just before his 30th birthday, he figured out that he wanted to be a Life Coach—dedicated himself to it—and he lived happily ever after.