Career Guide for IT and Technical Jobs

Articles and tips for advancing your IT job/career and salary.

Do you want to learn about software developer career change options? Are you considering a change?

As the leading IT recruiter in Dallas and across Texas, we often see IT types transition between a wide variety of positions.  It is not uncommon to see a Network Security Engineer who was a Software Engineer after starting in Product Development.  

If you’re currently a software developer but you're wondering career options to switch to something new then this post might be helpful. In it, we explore career change options for software developers to consider.  We hope you enjoy it. 

Are you overwhelmed by the variations of software development career paths? Wondering which is right for you?

The aspiration to become a software developer is something that many tech professionals share, especially today when the job outlook in the Dallas information technology (IT) sector is so good. But software development is more of a broad category than an actual job description, and there are many paths within software development you can choose.

As a career software developer (as opposed to a freelancer or entrepreneur), the typical tech career path starts as a junior software developer and then moves to a senior software developer.

After that, an IT professional can stay on the technical side and become a lead developer or can move to management and as you grow in experience and communications skills become a senior software development leader.

In the booming Dallas tech market, there is a great deal of flexibility in terms of where you work, whom you work for, and what IT projects you work on.

In today’s post, we’ll explore the different paths and opportunities available in the world of software development careers.

The goal of a technical recruiter is to help IT professionals find employment. The technical recruiter's secondary but equally important goal is to help employers find the best candidates for their IT job openings.  

To put it bluntly, there is a war going on for tech talent and jobs these days. If you are searching for a new IT job in 2018 you might feel like you navigating a fast-moving battlefield full of landmines and changing boundaries.  

The technical recruiting industry exists to make searching, interviewing and negotiating for your new job easier and more effective.

Does job searching on your own make you feel like your wasting time? If you have spent hours or maybe weeks eyeballing the top tech job boards or monitoring the emails from the big online recruiters with little or no luck, then it may be time for you to consider working with a Dallas technical recruiter.  Keep reading to learn more about how technical recruiters can save you from wasting your precious time.

At some point, we may realize that our information technology job no longer holds any challenge for us; that whatever once made it fun has faded and become routine. You have asked for new opportunities, but there just doesn’t seem to be any—not that they’re being withheld—but the company doesn’t appear to have any higher ambitions.

Well, they may be satisfied with their niche, but you’re not obliged to sail on that boring cargo ship! It’s time to start looking for a cruise liner or a speedboat to continue your voyage. To extend the analogy, don’t rock the boat or abandon your duties—that will come back to haunt you when it is time to ask for references—keep doing your current job, and doing it well.

Once you have a information technology job offer, and it’s time to take your leave, then you can give an appropriate amount of notice, and offer to help train the person taking over your responsibilities. That is how a professional would handle it.

Be a Morning Person: The Need to Succeed in the IT Field

While we specialize in IT staffing in Dallas, these are some ideas, rules, and observations that apply universally.The most important one is that people who procrastinate are committing self-sabotage.

With a sparkling new degree in hand and a well-deserved sense of accomplishment after four (or five or six) years of hard work, college graduates understandably feel excited to take on the challenges of building a career in the information technology sector. Most of 2017’s grads also probably feel that their alma mater has fully prepared them for joining today’s IT workforce, providing the skills and insights necessary for them to get their dream job.

Many of the people in charge of those dream jobs disagree. 

The answer to the question in the title is a very clear cut "it depends,” which means we're going to have to look at it a little more closely.  Let's discover why…

Directive 8570, issued by the Department of Defense (DoD), states that any person, entity, contractor, or business which desires to have business dealings with the DoD (or most branches of government), or wishes to be employed by same and conduct information assurance services, must have training & certification in the field of information security. That's quite a mouthful.

There are a number of reasons to choose one of these two options over the other. Much of it depends on your personal predilections such as variety vs. consistency; high temporary-income vs. lower consistent-income; stability vs. flexibility.

Although there are no absolutes, it's not hard to extrapolate that the contract consulting option might attract more "Type A" personalities, and the permanent positions might attract more "Type B.” But this is just a generalization, of course. Let's look at these two items in more detail.

It will only become easier…

Whether you're coming from another field, or IT has been your dream ever since you were five years old, people new to this industry start at the bottom and work their way up.  There are very few exceptions.

If you're an autodidact that has been writing code since age 10, and have programmed an artificial intelligence program that can pass the Turing Test, you might be able to start at $150,000 per year or more.  The reality, however, is that you ought to be prepared to start well under $50,000 and maybe as little as $20,000 per year on the Help Desk.  

What's the difference?

The words sound similar but they possess significantly different meanings. Confusing one word for the other can make you look silly, or throw your boss into a panic, if you say you want to reskill instead of upskill.

"What? Do you want to change departments, or are you quitting?"
"No, nothing like that! I just want to take a night course in Network Management so you can promote me."
"Oh! You want to upskill, not leave and start a completely different career... That's a relief!"

Hopefully your boss isn't that literal-minded, and just thought you were a bit dimwitted, rather than that you were abandoning the department.

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