Resume Writing Tips for IT and Technical Jobs

Advice and articles to help make your technical job resume get the results you want for your IT career.

The U.S. Department of Defense doesn't post guards at the entrance to the subterranean bunker in Cheyenne Mountain for show.  They're there to keep out individuals that don't belong.

Applicant Tracking Software (ATS) does the same thing for businesses that are seeking employees.  It may not be a stunning revelation, but HR departments are faced with a deluge of résumés every time they offer a position.  Most HR professionals will tell you that, at the very least, half of the applicants are unqualified for the job.

Friday, 12 August 2016

Your Best IT Résumé

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Creating your best IT résumé is not something you should take lightly. Thinking that it doesn't matter because "They'll be begging to hire me once I talk to them" is akin to standing outside your locked house declaring "When I get inside and find my keys, I am definitely coming back out to unlock this door!"  

Wrong order, my friend, wrong order! Your résumé is your key. Unless you have some great nepotism working in your favor, you're completely stymied without a great résumé.

Thursday, 30 June 2016

Résumé means Showcase

If you operated a grocery store, it is very likely that you would send out a weekly flyer telling everybody about all of your specially priced items. Potential customers would look and say "I need this, and this, and this…I guess I'll shop there this week." That is a fine strategy when you are dealing with a massive sea of potential buyers.

That is not what you are doing with your résumé. It's time to change the way you think about things.

smartphone mobile resumeUnless you rarely leave your home, it should come as no surprise to you that recent reports show that 75% of Americans now use smartphones and that there are more smartphones in use that there are people on this planet.

It's almost impossible to go anywhere without seeing people using their smartphones to stay connected with friends, search the web, or play games. Besides keeping up with Facebook and Twitter, smartphones are replacing desk and laptop computers for Dallas job seekers to search for employment while on the go.

According to a survey published last September by Internet job-search company Indeed, 65% of Americans would like to be able to apply for a job using their mobile phone. They warn that companies who fail to make the application process optimized for smartphone users will end up losing top talent to businesses that make it quick and easy to apply for open positions.

As a leader in Dallas IT staffing recruitment, we pride ourselves on staying abreast of trends that our clients who seek technology jobs in Dallas expect from a top-notch recruitment firm. In this article I'm going to share what I've learned about mobile-optimization and talk about what recruiters can do to make sure they are able to snag the top talent and I'll explain to job seekers how they can use their smartphones to find and apply for the best jobs.

tips-for-resumeIf the prospect of writing a resume feels overwhelming you….wait, scratch that. Of course you are feeling overwhelmed. After all, the reason you are sitting here reading this article is because you are unemployed, underemployed, or just bored with your current job and the only way you’re going to get to change things is to get a quality resume out to prospective employers. The problem is that there is a big, fat gray elephant standing in the way of you getting started.

Building an updated resume that gets the right kind of attention is hard work; it requires thinking about the past, both good and bad work experience.

It requires being honest with yourself and acknowledging your strengths and weaknesses. You may not know where to begin.

Whether that elephant is procrastination or simply not knowing how to get started, it is a huge obstacle standing in the way of you getting where you want to go.

There is no way over, under or around it. Well, grab your knife and fork (okay, a pen) because, as I’m sure you’ve heard, the only way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time.

Thursday, 25 September 2014

Cover Letter 101: Sell, Don’t Tell

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A cover letter is just another opportunity for you to sell yourself to the hiring manager.  Take full advantage of that advertising space and make it powerful and convincing.

How do you accomplish that?  Sell, don’t tell. And by that, we mean: Use powerful anecdotes from your personal experience to illustrate your super powers.

For example, you might want to say: “I have excellent growth potential.”  Your reader, though, may simply judge your statement as hype.  After all, the average person is inundated daily with sales pitches and exaggerated claims.  Instead, sell by providing a convincing story.

Try this: “I was hired as a junior administrative assistant and worked my way up through the ranks to become a department director.”

Your reader is more likely to be wowed by that example and to conclude: “Hey, this candidate has excellent growth potential.”  Instead of “telling” the hiring manager something, you let the hiring manager come to his or her own conclusion.

It is, of course, the conclusion you wanted them to come to, all along.

technical skillsIt must be interesting for hiring managers to see the various ways that job candidates present themselves. Some of the most skilled technical workers put very little effort into their resume, believing that their background speaks for itself. This may not be such a good idea in today's competitive job market. No matter how qualified you are for the job, your resume is what sells you to a potential employer.

Landing a job in Information Technology may sound simple if you’ve always been a computer whiz.  Many newly minted computer science graduates believe that once their resumes are printed and they have an Information Technology degree, it will be easy to land a well-paying IT job.  This may be true for that top 5 percent of graduates from the nation’s best technology schools, but it may not be the case for the other 95 percent.  If it were really this simple, then everyone would be majoring in IT or Computer Science.  In today’s more competitive job market, college graduates are competing against seasoned veterans with impressive resumes in Information Technology.  When reality sets in, most job seekers realize that a more aggressive approach is required.

If you’re like most Information Technology (IT) job seekers, you dream about working at one of the fastest moving U.S. technology companies, like Facebook, Google or Apple.  But with nearly 15 million Americans looking for work, it’s hard to imagine what it takes to find your dream job at one of these employers.  Surprisingly, some of the best companies to work for are facing a talent shortage, especially in some of the top IT positions.  While there may be plenty of workers available, few of them possess the skills to meet the highly specialized needs of Silicon Valley.