How To Have Good Posture When You Work On a Laptop All Day

Your posture when you work on a laptop matters

If You Want To Avoid Back Problems, Good Posture When You Work On a Laptop Is Essential Maintaining good posture when you work on a laptop all day may not be automatic for information technology (IT) professionals, but doing so will automatically improve your overall health and well-being. While laptops offer convenience, portability, and productivity, spending all day hunched over them can lead to painful back, neck, and shoulder problems. Unfortunately, many tech employees become so focused on their work (or not work, as the case may be) that they can quickly and easily succumb to slouching, hunching, and other unhealthy ways of sitting. That doesn’t mean that it’s difficult to have good posture when you work on a laptop; it just requires some thoughtfulness and attention. Here are six easy tips for improving your posture when you work on a laptop all day. 1. Sit up straight! Yes, this is what your mom and teachers constantly told you. But, as with much of the advice from your childhood, they were right. Despite the name “laptop,” these computers are better used on a desk to support good posture. That’s not to say you can never use the device on your lap; just limit the time to no more than 20 minutes. Whenever possible, sit at your desk when you’re working, feet flat on the floor and elbows by your side so your arms form an L-shape at the elbow joint. You can change foot position every few minutes to encourage blood flow and muscle relaxation. 2. Invest in a good chair You invest in a good bed because you spend a lot of time sleeping,  and a good bed will help you sleep better. You should also invest in a quality ergonomic chair because you spend a lot of time working, and a chair specifically designed with proper ergonomics in mind will help you to work better. Remember that chairs are not one-size-fits-all. Depending on your stature, you may find that some chairs are too high, or conversely, too low to provide you with proper ergonomic support. Take the time to research and even sit in chairs if possible before purchasing. The right ergonomic chair for you will allow for adjustments to the height, tilt, and back position. When sitting, your knees should be just lower than your hips. Adjust your chair’s height so you can use the keyboard with your wrists and forearms straight and level with the floor. This will help your posture and minimize the chances of developing a repetitive stress injury. 3. Get an external keyboard and mouse and place them correctly External keyboards and mice are popular because they allow you to type and click with natural wrist postures regardless of where your laptop screen is. Sometimes, what’s best for your wrists is not what’s best for your eyes. Separating the screen from your keyboard and mouse can optimize both.  Place your keyboard directly in front of you when typing, and your mouse just to the side of the keyboard. Leave a gap of about four to six inches at the front of the desk to rest your wrists when you’re not typing. 4. Keep your screen at eye level right in front of you To maintain good posture when you work on a laptop all day, you may need to adjust the position of the screen. (A task that is much easier if you invest in the external keyboard and mouse mentioned above.) Your screen should be directly in front of you, with the top of the screen near eye level. You may need to buy a monitor stand or a laptop raiser to make this happen. Alternatively, even a large book or sturdy box placed under your laptop can do the trick. Having your screen at eye level will keep you from straining your neck because you are looking down all the time. 5. Get a bigger screen or up your font size When you can’t read or see something clearly, your instinct is to move closer to what you are looking at. But in leaning forward to get closer to your screen, you cause strain on your back and neck that will show in time in sore and stiff muscles.  Your goal should be to see the items on your screen clearly while sitting up straight. This may require a separate, larger monitor than the one on your laptop. Alternatively, increase the font size on your display to ease the strain on your eyes and back. Related: How To Reduce Tech Staff Eye Strain 6. Give yourself a break Tech professionals are all guilty of being so involved with the task at hand that hours can go by (in what seems like the blink of an eye) without changing position. Combat that tendency by taking frequent short breaks (around once an hour) to stand or walk around to give your back muscles a break. In addition or alternatively, do some simple stretches while sitting at your desk, such as stretching your shoulders, neck, arms, and legs. GTN Technical Staffing: Positioning Top Tech Talent For Career Success If you are a talented IT professional looking for new opportunities, GTN Technical Staffing has the resources and experience to connect you with the world’s top tech companies. Contact us today to learn how we can help position you for success. More From Our Tech Careers Blog: Top IT Skills In Demand Right Now Ballsy Questions To Ask During Tech Interviews How Can A Tech Recruiting Agency Help Me?

Continue Reading

9 Key Technology Communities to Join For Web Developers

Technology Communities To Join As A Web Developer

There is No Shortage of Helpful Technology Communities to Join The most sought-after web developers know the best technology communities to join to help them achieve their career goals.  Such online communities offer countless opportunities to network, exchange ideas, expand skillsets, and boost their profile among other web developers. If you want to up the ante in your developer career path, there isn’t a shortage of technology communities to join. The key is finding the one (or ones) that best match your interests and goals. Here are nine key technology communities to join for web developers: GitHub More than 65 million web developers share ideas, work together, ask questions, and build projects on GitHub. This real-time, collaboration-centric website is one of the most popular and authoritative technology communities to join, with more than 3 million organizations using GitHub and a repository of over 200 million resources. The GitHub Community Forum is a great place to contribute your thoughts and follow discussions on subjects of interest to you. Stack Overflow An open community and public platform for anyone who codes or wants to learn code, Stack Overflow sees over 100 million visitors every month. On Stack Overflow, you can ask questions and provide answers to others on an infinite number of web development and programming subjects. Visitors have asked over 21 million questions to date, and developers on the site obtained help from the Stack Overflow Collective over 50 billion times. By answering questions, you can build a reputation for your expertise as well as your generosity in helping others advance their careers, and may even find yourself a mentor to advance yours as well. Related: How to Find a Mentor to Help Advance Your High-Tech Career HackerNews HackerNews is a cybersecurity news site with a techy bend. Users share hundreds of articles on interesting and relevant technology topics every day. You can easily and instantly share articles that you write with millions of fellow developers who can then comment, provide feedback and engage with you on your work. HackerNews is one of the top technology communities to join to share your stories and get insights from other developers. Hackernoon On Hackernoon, a community of over 15,000 tech professionals and more than three million tech enthusiasts can read, write, and publish technical articles internationally. Leading tech companies such as Google, Apple, Adobe, Intel, Samsung, IBM, and Tesla share articles and insights on Hackernoon about hundreds of different topics from technology, coding languages, to cybersecurity, software, and decentralization. Hashnode Hashnode is one of our favorite recommendations for technology communities to join for web developers. This global community of developers and programmers is a platform to share ongoing projects, ask and answer questions, and stay connected to other tech professionals. One feature that we love is the ability to start your own blog on the site and promote your brand. But, if you value anonymity, the option to anonymously publish technical blogs or real-life development problems is also available. These posts can then be shared with all community members. Users can follow authors and tags such as Java, Python, React, JavaScript, CSS. FreeCodeCamp FreeCodeCamp is a 100 percent free non-profit platform where tech professionals and enthusiasts alike can learn and practice coding. Companies like Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft have hired over 40,000 FreeCodeCamp graduates, who earn a free certificate for completing small projects at their own pace. The site contains thousands of videos, articles, interactive coding lessons, forums, and study groups to help people learn to code. Women Who Code Built to encourage and empower women in tech, Women Who Code has over 290,000 members who are experienced developers and programmers at every level of industry and every stage of their careers. Women can find coding resources, job openings, leadership opportunities, and events that can expand their skills and open up doors in the larger global development community. CodeProject CodeProject is one of the largest technology communities to join, with over 14 million tech professionals joining together to learn, teach, and have fun with coding projects. Community members from all over the world meet here to share free code, tutorials, and knowledge to help their fellow developers. Digital Ocean On the surface, Digital Ocean may appear to be another cloud computing resource company. But below the surface, Digital Ocean promotes a community of web developers supporting fellow developers through exchanging ideas and insights.  The site contains hundreds of tutorials and questions and answers to provide input from tech professionals all over the world. GTN Technical Staffing: Connecting IT Pros With The Companies That Need Them Have you already joined one or more of these top technology communities for web developers? Are you ready to advance your web developer or other IT career? Contact GTN Technical Staffing today to learn how we can help you get the technology career you want and deserve. More From Our Tech Careers Blog: Tips For Young Tech Pros To Expand Their Professional Network What Is the Best Career Advice for New Programmers? Top 10 IT Skills in Demand Right Now

Continue Reading

How Can a Tech Recruiting Agency Help Me?

why you should work with a tech recruiting agency

The Tech Employment Market Can Be a Jungle. A Tech Recruiting Agency Can Be Your Guide. No matter where you are on your tech career journey, an experienced and committed tech recruiting agency can help you reach your desired destination. And in a booming and dynamic industry with countless opportunities and career paths, having an experienced guide can make all the difference. It is sad to say, but talent and skills alone may not be enough when you are competing against hundreds or thousands of equally qualified and driven IT professionals. How do you make yourself stand out? How do you get your resume noticed? How do you get hiring managers to call you for an interview? The answer to all these questions is simple. You work with a tech recruiting agency that has the knowledge, connections, and insights to make all of those things happen.   What is a Tech Recruiting Agency? One of the most significant challenges tech companies face is finding, attracting, and retaining top IT talent. Smaller companies may not have the time and resources needed to browse stacks of resumes, narrow that pile down to a small group of qualified interview candidates, and then choose the right person to fill the role.  Even large global tech companies can struggle with talent acquisition. It’s a big world, and when big businesses need employees with specific technical skills, their search may extend around the globe for the right candidates. In such situations, big companies often reach out to a tech recruiting agency or an IT staffing company to assist them in their quest.  A tech recruiting agency helps connect IT companies with IT professionals by working with both. The benefits of working with a recruiter go both ways. Employers save time and money by having a recruiting agency do the legwork of finding the right people for open positions. Tech employment seekers get the advantage of having that same agency push their resume forward toward the companies that are looking to fill critical roles. It is a classic “win-win” scenario. IT Companies Trust Tech Recruiting Agencies To Get Them Top Talent You have tech skills. Tech companies need them. A tech recruiting agency will know your specific talents and know what career opportunities are out there, including ones that may not yet be listed or advertised on any other medium.  Tech recruiting agencies regularly work with the world’s top IT employers. These relationships often go back years or decades. During that time, these employers come to trust and rely upon the recruiter’s judgment and recommendations as they consistently deliver highly qualified candidates who go on to become rockstar employees. If you are one of those candidates and a trusted recruiter tells a potential employer to give you a look, the odds are pretty high that they will.  A Tech Recruiting Agency Will Make You a Better Candidate A tech recruiter’s mission is to get you the career opportunities you want, and they only get paid if they are successful. That makes them highly motivated to help you in any way they can. You can think of a tech recruiting agency as your personal promoter and career coach that will use all of their talents and efforts to make you the best candidate you can be. For instance, your dedicated recruiter can help you polish your resume so that it makes the best possible first impression. They can work with you to improve your technical interview skills and offer you personalized career advice and guidance. This guidance can be particularly helpful for tech professionals who have substantial experience or hard-to-find technical skillsets. GTN Technical Staffing Can Keep Your Tech Career Moving In The Right Direction  Employment search is rarely fun and never easy. Whether you’re a seasoned IT professional looking for new opportunities or are a recent college graduate seeking your first tech job, finding the right position can take months. Those months can feel like years, especially if employers are not calling you, or you get email after email politely thanking you for your interest and wishing you the best of luck finding a position – with some other company. A tech recruiting agency can increase your chances of success in the IT job market and help you stand out from the crowd. At GTN Technical Staffing, we have an unmatched record of success getting tech talent hired.   Don’t wait any longer to find your dream tech position. Check out our IT & technical career search board or reach out to our team of experienced tech recruiters today. Additional Reading From Our Tech Skills Blog: How To Get Your Resume Noticed By Technical Hiring Managers Top 10 IT Skills In Demand Right Now Tech Staffing: The Most Oddball Interview Questions To Expect In 2021

Continue Reading

Tips For Young Tech Pros To Expand Their Professional Network

Tips For Expanding Your Professional Network

These Tips For Expanding Your Professional Network Can Expand Your Professional Horizons If you want to advance your tech career, open up new opportunities, and enrich your life professionally and personally, you may enjoy our tips for expanding your professional network. You are likely familiar with the expression, it’s not WHAT you know, it’s WHO you know.  This can be especially true in the IT industry. A broad professional network of talented, interconnected, and diverse information technology pros – who you know – can be just as impactful to your career trajectory as what you know. Too often, however, people in tech and other industries only see networking as something you do when you’re looking for a job. The reality is that expanding your professional network should be an ever-present effort no matter how happy you are in your current position. Yes, an expansive professional network will increase your chances of discovering and securing new career opportunities. But these same people can be instrumental in helping you grow your skillset and raise your profile in the tech community at every stage of your professional journey. The bottom line is that if you’re a young tech pro who wants to get a leg-up on your colleagues, you need a good network. 4 Tips For Expanding Your Professional Network 1. Make A Good First Online Impression You only have one chance to make a first impression. In today’s digitally sophisticated world, your online presence is often the first (and sometimes the only) information that others see about you. Even after meeting someone face-to-face, chances are they will look for you on LinkedIn or other professional networking sites. Therefore, it is worth some time to lay a solid online foundation for such early interactions by tuning up your LinkedIn profile, your bio on your company’s website, and elsewhere. Not only should it be accurate, complete, and up to date, but it should also reflect who you are and your values and career objectives. With a solid and compelling profile in hand, remember to use LinkedIn for what it was built for: making connections with others and building a solid stable of followers. You should also consider bringing your personal social media in line with your professional presence. You would never want to lose a priceless professional connection because of what comes up when someone Googles your name. 2. Get Out Of Your Seat You can acquire a great deal of knowledge and useful information by attending seminars, professional education events, or other functions where tech types like yourself gather to learn. Such events are golden opportunities for networking, surrounded as you are by people in your industry or who share your same interests. Right off the bat, you have something in common with the scores or hundreds of people in attendance. Introduce yourself to those around you, get names and contact information, and make the rounds during breaks. If a speaker is particularly interesting and engaging, stick around after their presentation to make conversation about what they just spoke about, ask questions, and make the connection. If all you do is sit in your chair listening and taking notes, that is all your presence will accomplish. You Might Be Interested In: How to Find a Mentor to Help Advance Your High-Tech Career 3. Make Connections Outside The Tech Industry Understandably, most professional networking efforts for young tech professionals focus on connecting with other tech professionals. But, as important as that is, you should not limit your networking to just the technology industry. There are plenty of people in other professions or areas who can help you broaden your horizons and open doors to opportunities you may not even know existed. That retiree you met while volunteering at a local food bank? Their son may be launching a tech start-up in need of the programming talent you possess. That college classmate you reconnected with at an alumni event? They may know someone at a company you’ve always been interested in joining. Just getting to meet people outside of the tech bubble is an excellent way to make sure that you don’t live in a bubble as well. 4. Stay In Touch No one wants to feel that their only value to you is when you need something from them.  Professional networks, like friendships, don’t thrive when they are a one-way street or if you don’t keep in touch from time to time. In addition to expanding your professional network, make sure you take care of the network you already have. Reengage with your connections just to say hello and see what they’ve been up to. Like and give positive feedback on their posts. To be a (professional) friend, you need to be a (professional) friend! Expand Your Professional Opportunities: Contact GTN Technical Staffing Today At GTN Technical Staffing, our network includes the world’s top technology companies and most in-demand tech talent. We can help young tech pros like you connect with those employers starting right now. Contact us today to learn how we can help you move forward in your IT career. More From GTN’s Tech Professionals Blog: Top 10 IT Skills In Demand Right Now How Can A Programmer Build Influence When First Starting Their Career 9 Key Technology Communities To Join For Web Developers

Continue Reading

How to Find a Mentor to Help Advance Your High-Tech Career

Knowing How to Find a Mentor Can Be the Key to Finding Your Way in Tech If you want to know how to move your information technology career forward, you need to know how to find a mentor. Your high-tech career is a long journey. As you advance, you’ll encounter twists and turns, roadblocks and pitfalls, forks in the road, and roads you didn’t even know existed. Having an experienced guide who can help you navigate these uncharted waters can be the key to keeping you on the right course in the tech industry. While some technology companies have formal mentoring programs in which they pair a more seasoned pro with someone just starting out, many new IT professionals will need to figure out how to find a mentor on their own. Your search may include connecting with a mentor at your current company, but you shouldn’t necessarily limit your efforts to your workplace. Wherever and however you hook up with a mentor, that individual should be experienced, available, empathetic, open, and enthusiastic about helping you. Here are some helpful tips on how to find a mentor who will help you find your way in an ever-changing technology landscape. Do What Comes Naturally In your current tech role, there may be someone you work with or for whom you use as your go-to person when you have a question or need guidance. There may be a certain team member you turn to for coding help, or perhaps a senior developer who’s always receptive when you knock on their door looking for advice. These organic relationships often evolve into a mentorship dynamic, even if neither you nor the other person formally recognizes it as such. In addition to providing general or technical guidance, an in-house mentor can offer you unique insights about your workplace, its culture, and the interpersonal dynamics that play a role in your trajectory at the company. But in addition to a mentor in your office, there may be issues or concerns that you’re not comfortable raising with a direct supervisor or colleague. Similarly, you may be looking to expand your skill sets and network beyond what an in-house mentor can offer. These common roadblocks prove why you need to broaden your horizons and look elsewhere for a mentor. Network Like You Know How Important Networking Is We don’t have to tell you how critical networking is when it comes to finding new opportunities or growing your circle of relationships in the tech industry. But networking also provides a great way to locate potential mentors. Stay in touch with college friends and other pals in tech and ask them if they know of any good mentor candidates. Go to tech talks and seminars and mingle with your fellow IT pros. If a speaker is particularly impressive, stick around and introduce yourself. Arrange for informational interviews with people whose career paths reflect what you would like to see happen in your own career. Any of these folks could wind up being a perfect mentor. Style and Substance A good mentor needs to know their stuff, to be sure. But a person could be the best in their field, a technical genius, a renowned thought leader, and still be a horrible mentor. In college, all of us had at least one professor who was absolutely brilliant in their field but couldn’t actually teach to save their life. The mentor you want needs to be able to share their knowledge effectively. They also should be someone whose style and approach you find appealing or wish to emulate. Try to find a mentor who shares your values and interests, both inside the tech industry and in their other endeavors. The mentor-mentee relationship is one that combines the professional with the personal. Don’t discount the importance of the latter when it comes to selecting a mentor. Keep Things Casual Very few tech professionals become mentors at first sight. Explicitly asking someone to be your mentor at your first meeting is like asking someone to marry you on a first date. That doesn’t mean you can’t ask your potential mentor questions or explore how they may be a good fit. But let things progress casually. Establish trust and a comfort level and build upon that. Find the Right Mentor by Finding the Right Tech Company with GTN Technical Staffing When the top technology companies need top talent who possess the IT skills in demand this year and in the years that follow, they turn to GTN Technical Staffing. We can help new programmers like you connect with those employers starting right now. Contact us today to learn how we can help you move forward in your IT career by finding the right company with the right people to be your next mentor. Read More by GTN Technical Staffing What Makes a Software Engineer Stay in a New Job? Advice on Holding a Good Remote Presentation 4 Ways to Promote the Professional Growth of Tech Employees

Continue Reading

What Is the Best Career Advice for New Programmers?

Do’s and Don’ts for Technology Industry Newbies There is no shortage of career advice for new programmers. Family, friends, colleagues, the barista you see every morning at Starbucks – all of them want to see you succeed and mean well when they tell you what you should do to move forward in your programming career. Some of that advice can be spot on, while other suggestions may not be terribly helpful. But since all of us at GTN Technical Consulting make it our mission to help programmers and IT professionals get the job they want, we thought we’d give our two cents with career advice for new programmers. Get a Mentor – Somewhere Else Starting your programming career is like the beginning of a long journey to a place you’ve never been before. So, you’ll find it helpful to have an experienced guide who can show you the way and help you avoid the pitfalls that could slow you down or throw your career off track. Connecting with a mentor at your current company is absolutely something you should try to do. A mentor can show you the specific ropes of your workplace, help you understand the interpersonal dynamics of your superiors, and assist you in developing your technical skills. In addition to a mentor in your office, you’ll want to find a programmer, software engineer or technology professional on the outside who can give you guidance as well. Their perspective may be more objective and unbiased, and you can speak more freely about subjects that would be problematic if you shared them internally. Ask Questions One of the keys to success, at any point in your career, is knowing what you don’t know. And when you’re just starting out in programming, no matter how excellent your education was, you’ll discover a ton you don’t know. How do you learn what you don’t know? You ask questions. And any technology company worth its salt should recognize that asking questions shows strength, not weakness. Being inquisitive shows that you want to expand your knowledge base and become better at your job. Finding and asking questions reveals that you would rather get things right when you start a project rather than winging it and getting it wrong because you didn’t reach out for needed information. You Might Like: Ballsy Questions To Ask During A Tech Interview Speak Up and Contribute Similarly, don’t let your status as a newbie prevent you from speaking up if you think you have something positive to contribute. Many folks just starting out are understandably reluctant to talk in meetings, make suggestions, or otherwise share their views because they are afraid of embarrassing themselves. But you can’t win if you don’t play, as they say. Your good idea may, in fact, be a good idea. But that idea will be one that nobody ever knows about if you don’t open your mouth. Speaking up shows that you are engaged and that you want to actively participate in your team’s or company’s success. Prepare for upcoming meetings by doing the kind of research that increases the odds that your contribution will be well-received. Cut Yourself Some Slack You’re going to make a mistake. No matter how much of a code-slinger you may be, something, sometime, somehow will go wrong. And when you’re just beginning your career, that can be sooner than later. But the true measure of your character and abilities proves not in the mistakes you make; it’s how you respond to them. Take responsibility. Don’t panic. Let your supervisors know about the error, have a plan for fixing your blunder, or ask for guidance as to how best to do so. You can let yourself be upset with yourself or embarrassed, but don’t dwell on your mistakes. Use them as an opportunity to learn and avoid similar problems going forward. And remember that your superiors and more senior colleagues were once newbies just like you, and they made mistakes just like you will. Our Last Piece of Career Advice for New Programmers? Contact GTN Technical Staffing Today When the top technology companies need top talent who possess the IT skills in demand this year and in the years that follow, they turn to GTN Technical Staffing. We can help new programmers like you connect with those employers starting right now. Contact us today to learn how we can help you move forward in your IT career by finding the right company right now Read More Career Advice from GTN Technical Staffing Top Ten IT Skills in Demand Right Now Get Your Resume Noticed by Technical Hiring Managers How to Find a Mentor to Help Advance Your High-Tech Career

Continue Reading

Top 10 IT Skills in Demand Right Now

Here’s What You Should Have in Your IT Toolbox in 2021 The IT skills in demand ten years ago – five years ago, even – are not necessarily the same skills that will make you a sought-after technology professional today. Advances should come as no surprise in an industry where unrelenting transformative change is the standard operating procedure. Therefore, enhancing and expanding skillsets should be the standard operating procedure for IT professionals as well. The ability to keep pace with evolving technology and changing roles is what separates those who will see their careers propelled forward and those who stagnate in inertia. If you want to make yourself the most marketable IT professional you can be, consider building your competence and experience in these 10 IT skills in demand right now: 1. Artificial Intelligence Skills The number of products, systems, and industries integrating and relying upon artificial intelligence (AI) is growing exponentially. IT professionals should develop their knowledge of data engineering and the programming languages, including natural language processing (NLP), that form the foundation of AI. 2. Cloud Computing Skills Cloud computing was seeing steady and significant growth for years before the events of 2020. The expansion of remote work and the need to reduce capital expenses that it caused, only further cemented cloud computing’s place at the center of business operations across industries. IT pros should arm themselves with essential cloud computing skills, such as configuration, deployment, security for cloud services, management, and troubleshooting. 3. Machine Learning Skills To grow their machine learning skill set, technology professionals should focus on the fundamentals behind machine learning and finding patterns in data, including software engineering, system design, computer science fundamentals, and programming. 4. Data Science Skills Data is everything. But data only has value if organizations can interpret, organize, understand, and use that information in ways that facilitate change and create better services and products. Hence, the ability to decipher raw data and transform it into usable, comprehensible feedback proves absolutely essential. Learning to work with SAS, R, Python, and other programming languages are data science skills that will serve IT professionals well. 5. Cybersecurity Skills Every day it seems the news contains a story about yet another hack, data breach, ransomware attack, or other cybersecurity failures. Having cybersecurity skills in your toolbox, such as risk assessment, identification, management, and remediation can make you a valuable commodity as organizations spend more time and effort building their defenses against these existential threats. 6. Big Data Skills Big data enables companies to analyze vast amounts of information so they can make optimal business decisions. Big data-related IT skills in demand this year include effective problem-solving skills, data handling proficiency, and an understanding of programming languages. 7. Soft Skills Technical aptitude is indispensable for technology professionals, but so too are the skills that facilitate collaboration, teamwork, and a positive working environment. Building your “soft skills” and emotional intelligence can make you even more effective and impactful when you deploy your prodigious technical knowledge. Empathy, active listening, adaptability, and well-developed communication skills are of increasing importance to tech job employers as they evaluate candidates. 8. Data Analytics Skills An IT pro that is well-versed in data analytics can examine raw data and reach conclusions that enable companies to get better business results. As a top IT skill in demand in 2021, data analytics skills include those that apply to other items on this list, such as machine learning, SQL, and language programming. 9. Mobile Application Skills Companies increasingly use mobile app solutions to expand their customer reach and foster enduring consumer relationships and loyalty. Understanding application programming interface (API) development platforms and cross-platform app development frameworks enable IT professionals to help organizations develop mobile apps. 10.   Virtual Reality Skills According to many industry analysts, virtual reality (VR) is primed for explosive growth in the next five years. Software engineering skills and working knowledge of 3D tools and sound can help technical professionals play a role in this expanding sector. GTN Technical Staffing: Connecting IT Skills in Demand With the Companies that Need Them When the top technology companies need top talent who possess the IT skills in demand this year and in the years that follow, they turn to GTN Technical Staffing. We can help IT professionals like you connect with those employers starting right now. Contact us today to learn how we can help you get the technology career you want and deserve. We strive to help both individuals and employers find the best fit, and we are ready to help you today! Read More from GTN Technical Staffing You Don’t Need a Recruiter The Future of Computer Science What Are the Expected Trends in Tech Employee Relocation?

Continue Reading

10 Powerful Zoom Meeting Phrases That Make People Like You

Real Ways to Get Others On Your Side When Meeting Virtually When it comes to the art of coming across well during a Zoom meeting, don’t discount the importance of Zoom meeting phrases. As we all have gotten used to interacting with colleagues through a screen, we’ve spent a lot of time perfecting our backgrounds, optimizing our lighting, and mastering the fashion trick of wearing sweatpants or pajama bottoms while looking dapper up top. But if you want to make the folks on the other end of your webcam like you, the words you say can be much more important than what score you get on “Room Rater.” Zoom Meeting Phrases Can Be Your On-Screen Go-To When we meet in person, we have many ways to get on others’ good side—a firm handshake, eye contact, body language, etc. But on screen, likability rests much more heavily on verbal cues and communication. Having some go-to comments can come in handy and increase dialogue and connection between you and other tech worker attendees. The best part of deploying powerful Zoom meeting phrases: you can have them at the ready without the need to memorize them! You can scribble them on Post-It Notes or list them on a document you can look at on your screen without anyone being the wiser. While you shouldn’t hesitate to come up with your own Zoom meeting phrases, here are ten suggestions that can make you the star of your laptop screen and help you hold good remote presentations. “What do you think?” People appreciate when others value their input and opinion. Listening to their thoughts makes them feel respected and relevant. Whatever the topic at hand, asking other people on the call what they think will get you on their good side. “My apologies for interrupting. Please continue.” One of the more frustrating elements of conference calls and Zoom meetings is people’s tendency to talk over each other, even when they have no intention of interrupting. When that happens, you can show others respect by apologizing for any such missteps and inviting them to keep speaking. “What can I do to help?” A friend in need is a friend indeed. If someone on the call seems to be struggling with a task or concept or feels overwhelmed by the amount of work on their plate, offering to assist them will generate a ton of goodwill. Allow your fellow tech employees to tell you what they think would help most, but then feel free to make your own suggestions as to how to make their life better. “Thanks for being here.” Zoom fatigue has proven very real. All of us are more than ready to be done with isolation. And while we understand that virtual work meetings are necessary until the world gets back to in-person work, that doesn’t mean we are thrilled to be once again staring at boxes full of faces. If you are the host of a Zoom meeting, be sure to express your understanding of these feelings and your appreciation to everyone for showing up and participating. “Please and thank you.” These are the magic words IRL, and they have the same effect on the screen. Common courtesy engenders good feelings and provides another way of showing respect to your fellow technical employees. “Tell me more about that.” If you want to show interest in what someone is saying, there’s no better way to do so than asking them to say more. An open-ended invitation to keep on sharing will make others feel valued and important. “You did a great job on ____.” Everyone likes and appreciates a compliment. Positive reinforcement and recognition of achievement always generate good feelings about the person dispensing the praise. “Why don’t you go ahead and take this one.” Even if you are the font of wisdom or the focus of a meeting, throwing a question directed to you over to one of your colleagues shows that you trust them and want to give them their moment to shine. “Can you repeat that?” Whether because of crosstalk or a technical glitch, we often miss things others say in a Zoom meeting, even if you are paying the utmost attention. Don’t hesitate in such situations to ask the person to repeat what they said. Asking someone to repeat themselves demonstrates that you want to know what they have to contribute. “I appreciate that.” When people do or say something nice for a colleague, they may do so for altruistic and selfless reasons. But that doesn’t mean they don’t expect acknowledgement or appreciation for their efforts. Be sure to express your thanks for what others have done for you or your organization. Remote or Otherwise, Great Tech Opportunities Don’t Just Present Themselves. GTN Can Help You Find Them. Companies are hiring, and your dream IT position is out there, no matter where you are. GTN Technical Staffing has earned a reputation throughout the tech industry for connecting the right talent to the right companies. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you land your next opportunity. More to Read on Technical Job Staffing How Can a Programmer Build Influence When First Starting Their Career?  Top 10 IT Skills in Demand Right Now You Don’t Need a Recruiter 

Continue Reading

How Can a Programmer Build Influence When First Starting Their Career?

Keep

It’s a Long Way to the Top, But Programmers Who Build Influence Get There Quicker A programmer who wants to become a sought-after talent who can write their own ticket is a programmer who builds influence. Establishing yourself as someone others in your company or industry turn to for inspiration, wisdom, and guidance proves to be no small endeavor. Building your reputation at your tech company takes time, commitment, savvy, and, of course, the technical skills and abilities needed for success in software or systems development. But when a programmer builds influence starting at the beginning of their career, it can make the journey from newbie to leader a much shorter one. What Does it Mean for a Programmer to Build Influence? Influence in your programming career is an intangible yet identifiable quality. Influence means that others listen to what you have to say, and that your co-workers respect your input and insights and act on them. This authority means that your voice, opinions, and talents matter to those you work for and with, as well as to the broader circle of individuals in your industry. Why Should a Programmer Build Influence? Simply put, influence equates to power. When your influence extends throughout your department, your company, and your industry, that impact puts you in the driver’s seat of your career. Others, including prospective tech recruiters and employers, will seek you out because so many others value and appreciate you. When you feel like and are at the bottom of the ladder at the beginning of your career, it can be hard to see how you move from looking up to others to others looking up to you. But by developing and practicing some fundamental skills and practices, your influence will steadily grow. Here are four ways a programmer can build influence early in their careers. Build Your Communications Skills You could have a game-changing and revolutionary concept, or even a modest but helpful suggestion, but if you can’t communicate effectively, your ideas will remain just that – ideas. If you want people to listen to you – an indispensable element of influence – you need to know how to speak to them. Just as important, you need to learn how to truly listen to others. This dialogue, this exchange of information, and the respect that comes from treating people with respect can be the foundation of building your influence and increasing your effectiveness and marketability throughout your techcareer. Be Consistent and Reliable At the start of your career, you are an unknown quality. Sure, your resume lists your impressive skills and background, and you aced your interview to get the job. But until you prove that you are dependable, that you will do what you say and mean what you say, you are unlikely to receive the increasing responsibilities that can advance your career. Focus on executing your responsibilities effectively and on time. Be reliable, over and over and over again. Consistency and reliability will build trust, and trust builds respect. If people doubt your word or commitment, you may still become an influence; it’s just that you will become a bad one. Add Your Two Cents You may be new, but that does not mean you have nothing to add to the conversation. Don’t be afraid to inject yourself into discussions and provide your opinions. Overcome any fear of embarrassment or rejection and put yourself out there. Joining conversations will allow others to get to know who you are and what you have to offer. People don’t ascend to positions of influence and leadership by being timid and staying quiet. Demonstrate Your Commitment to Professional Growth One of the best things you can do to build influence early in your tech career comes from consistently expanding your knowledge base and improving your skills. You aren’t much of an expert now, but as you broaden your horizons day after day, year after year, you can become one. Immerse yourself in programming generally or your role specifically by regularly attending industry conferences, enrolling in classes or specialized programs, or assuming leadership roles in professional organizations. Share what you’ve learned with your colleagues and superiors. Blog or write about the information and insights you acquire. These are public and visible signs of your determination and commitment to your programming tech career and your employer. GTN Technical Staffing: Connecting Top Tech Talent With the Top Tech Companies Becoming an influencer in the programming field can enhance your opportunities and make you a more attractive candidate for leading tech companies in need of top-flight programming talent. GTN Technical Staffing in Phoenix, Dallas, and nationwide can help connect you with those employers starting today. Contact us today to learn how we can help you get the programming career you want and deserve. Read More on Tech Job Staffing Benefits Remote Tech Employees Should Seek in Their Next Role How to Handle the “Desired Salary Question” Like a Boss How to Get What You Want: Tech Salary Negotiations 101

Continue Reading

Get Your Resume Noticed by Technical Hiring Managers

How to Rise Above a Sea of Other Candidates Before you can receive a job offer, before you even get an interview, you first need to get your resume noticed. The technical hiring managers who serve as the gatekeepers for your career journey must sift through scores or hundreds of resumes and cover letters to determine which candidates are worthy of a closer inspection. If your Curriculum vitae (CV) looks like the one above it in the pile, the one below it, and all of the other ones, it will quickly make its way to the circular file (or “Delete” key). If you want to have any chance of making it to the next stage in the screening process, your resume needs to be something special. It must distinguish you from all of the other faceless yet talented tech professionals trying to score the same gig. Your credentials, education, experience, and job history are what they are, but how you describe them and how you present yourself on a resume and, when applicable, your cover letter lies within your hands right now. Here are four ways to get your resume noticed and get yourself closer to your dream tech job. To Get Your Resume Noticed, Start at the Top All of those bullet points in your resume are important. The bullet sections are where you convey the nuts and bolts of your talents, skills, and experience. But bullet points and laundry lists don’t tell a story. They don’t say anything about who you are, what you’re looking for professionally, or what makes you unique. A good tech resume will start with the paper equivalent of the “elevator pitch.” That is, a brief statement that provides a frame and context for all of the details that follow. Just like an article or blog post, your resume should start with a powerful “hook” that will intrigue the hiring manager and persuade them to keep reading. Craft a brief, forward-looking narrative about who you are and where you want your tech career to go that complements the backward-looking descriptions of your qualifications and work experience. Tailor Your Resume to the Job Description Too many tech job seekers take a “set it and forget it” approach to their resume. They prepare a single resume that they robotically send out in response to every tech job listing, never modifying, reorganizing, or tailoring it to match the specifics of a job’s requirements or desired skill sets. Think of your existing resume as a foundation for multiple resumes, each of which should include or emphasize the specific qualities, experience, skills, and talents described in each individual job description. Resume tailoring could mean adding or deleting certain bullet points, or moving them to more prominent positions on your resume to match what the employer believes to be the essential attributes for the job. Additionally, many tech companies are increasingly using artificial intelligence (AI) to screen resumes before the hiring manager even sees them. AI programs look for matches between keywords and descriptors in the job listings and these same terms in responsive resumes. By including these critical terms where appropriate in your resume, you decrease the chances of a robot deciding that you’re not worth the hiring manager’s time. Numbers Can Speak Louder than Words Yes, you need good descriptive language and active verbs to tell a compelling tale of your experience and accomplishments. But what is more impressive: “Met project deadlines most of the time,” or, “Met 95% of all project deadlines”? Numbers and statistics that quantify the extent of your awesomeness take things out of the realm of self-flattery and into the world of cold, hard facts. If you have statistics that can tell the tale of your achievements, use them. Think Outside the Desk You have lots of work experience relevant to the position. You’ve described in great detail your information technology achievements, your tech projects, and your work skills. But you are more than your job. Many of the components that define you as a person are experiences, accomplishments, and interests beyond those in your career. By including relevant and impressive non-work experience in your resume – such as educational pursuits or volunteer activities – you can paint a more vibrant picture of yourself as a candidate and provide more reasons for a reviewer to give you a second look. Get Your Resume Noticed by the Best Tech Companies. Contact GTN Technical Staffing Today Whether you are looking for a permanent position,  temporary, or contract-based work in the tech industry, GTN Technical Staffing can help you get your resume noticed. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you find and nail your desired job. Read More on Technical Job Staffing Tech Staffing: The Most Oddball Interview Questions to Expect in 2021 What Is the Best Career Advice for New Programmers? How Can Personality Tests Can Help Improve Your Job Interviewing Skills

Continue Reading

Benefits Remote Tech Employees Should Seek in their Next Role

The pandemic has completely upended the tech industry, changing the way we live and work. While work-from-home policies have become common across all industries, the nature of the tech sphere makes remote work even more prevalent. An overwhelming majority of tech professionals believe these work arrangements are here to stay, which is why the most forward-thinking tech companies are already making changes to accommodate their staff. With many companies now operating remotely, job seekers may now have access to a broader range of job opportunities that aren’t confined to specific cities. As a tech professional looking for work during the pandemic, there are certain benefits you should seek to ensure you’re provided with the resources necessary to perform your job effectively from anywhere. As you consider your job prospects, here are four crucial benefits to look for: Wellness Benefits As tech workers continue to adjust to remote work, there’s no surprise that they’ve experienced adverse effects of the pandemic like increased levels of stress, burnout, and sleep troubles. As it may be difficult for employees to deliver if they feel isolated, stressed, or unhealthy, you should accept a position at a company that prioritizes the health and wellbeing of its employees. Employers often support their workforce’s health and happiness by offering perks like digital wellness hubs and virtual fitness classes, or by encouraging employees to tend to their physical, mental, and even financial health. They may also provide an employee assistance program (EAP) to help employees address personal and work-related problems. Based on your specific situation, you should inquire about a company’s wellness offerings to ensure your needs are adequately met. Technology Stipends When working from home, you won’t have access to the same standard equipment that’s provided in an office setting. To keep operations running smoothly, IT companies must ensure their employees have the necessary infrastructure and equipment to be most productive at home. To do this, some employers offer equipment or technology stipends, which can be used to purchase tools and equipment like a monitor, standing desk, mouse and keyboard, or any other technology you may need to perform your job. Stipends are offered as a one-time payment or paid out on an annual, quarterly, or monthly basis. Providing stipends gives employees the freedom to choose their equipment and personalize their at-home work setup, so they’re able to work most effectively. Before accepting your next job, be sure to ask what type of financial assistance they are able to offer to ensure you have access to the necessary tools and technology. Housing Accommodations More than 10 million Americans have expressed their plans to move as work-from-home arrangements continue to become permanent realities for many companies. Some IT professionals are taking advantage of these new work conditions by relocating to more comfortable and/or affordable homes. With positions no longer bound to specific geographic locations, you have the freedom to move wherever you please. However, moving can be a complicated and costly process. If you’re planning to move around the same time that you start a new job, you should ask about any assistance your employer can provide. They may offer help with moving costs, travel, or job placement for spouses. They may also be able to provide you with resources to help alleviate the cost and stress of relocating, such as local guides or information on affordable home financing choices like FHA loans. Some companies may even offer housing grants, depending on where you are planning to move. Benefits like these are even more impactful and attractive right now, as many individuals and families are experiencing the adverse financial effects of COVID. Training and Continuing Education Opportunities IT professionals are knowledge-hungry by nature and the tech landscape is constantly changing. Savvy tech managers understand that encouraging knowledge sharing and offering ongoing learning opportunities are great ways to not only help employees advance in their careers but also help their bottom line. Educational offerings like webinars, certification programs, and virtual lunch-and-learns can boost engagement, as well as help employees sharpen their skill sets and perform their jobs better. Continuing education could also come in the form of a mentorship program. A mentor can help you get acclimated to a new workplace quicker, decrease your learning curve, and help you build an internal network by introducing you to more colleagues. A structured virtual mentorship program can also provide a more engaging onboarding and work experience, so you can hit the ground running in your new role. GTN Technical Staffing: Helping You Find Your Next Tech Role The IT landscape and working conditions are changing quickly, and businesses are responding. If you’re on the hunt for your next IT position during these unprecedented times, we understand it may be hard to know exactly what to look for. GTN Technical Staffing can help find the right personal and professional fit for you. Contact us to learn how we can assist you in finding your ideal tech role.

Continue Reading

How to Ease Employee Concerns About Returning to Work

Coming Back to the Office Often Comes With Anxiety and Worry As 2020 recedes into the rearview mirror, businesses that ask their workforce to return to the office may need to address a variety of employee concerns. While employers face plenty of logistical and practical challenges when it comes to restarting their regular in-office operations, management should not overlook the worries and anxiety that many of their employees may be experiencing. Workers who have spent the better part of a year working from home may feel uneasy about coming back to a workplace in which they may be in close quarters with colleagues, customers, or clients. How can employers acknowledge these employee concerns and take affirmative steps to ease them? Here are three steps companies can take to help their workforce feel more comfortable and confident about returning to the office: Maintain a Safe Workplace Keeping the workplace safe is the most fundamental employer responsibility relating to reopening, and addresses the most relevant employee concerns. Employers should follow all federal and state laws, executive orders, and other rules and limitations established by local and state governments and public health authorities regarding indoor spaces and employee safety. As a general matter, employers and employees can turn to the guidance provided by the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for basic information about workplace safety. The CDC guidance includes detailed suggestions as well as general policies and protocols, including: Conducting regular employee health checks Conducting a workplace hazard assessment Encouraging employees to work from home if they are not feeling well Implementing policies and practices for improving cleanliness and hygiene Improving building ventilation systems A survey by Weber Shandwick and KRC Research found that the biggest employee concerns for workplace safety upon reopening largely mirror the CDC’s guidance. Specifically, employees want their employers to: Extensively clean and sanitize workspaces (55%) Encourage sick employees to stay home and implement flexible sick leave policies (52%) Promote personal hygiene (40%) Provide personal protective equipment (33%) Open, Honest, and Frequent Communication About Employee Concerns Employees want to know what is going on at the companies they work for. Employees who receive consistent updates from their companies are more likely to have positive views of their employers and are more inclined to look forward to going back to work. Ignorance is not, in fact, bliss. Therefore, employers should establish a communications plan specifically focused on workplace safety. This includes encouraging employees to respect each other’s personal space,  advising employees about their family and medical leave rights, and encouraging workers to share their concerns or questions without fear of reprisal. Tell employees about all you are doing to keep them safe and ask them if they have any other suggestions that would help ease their concerns. By enabling honest, two-way communication, company leaders can turn safety awareness into an opportunity to strengthen their corporate culture, enhance employee engagement, and increase long-term productivity and loyalty. Resources to Help Employees With the Challenges of Returning to Work The impact of the Government mandating stay-at-home orders on our collective mental health is undeniable. Depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and other mental health issues are on the rise as we all try to cope with the fear, isolation, and uncertainty that continue to cloud our lives. Returning to a changed workplace after months at home can only add to these feelings. Employers can address this concern by emphasizing the importance of mental health in employee communications. Create a supportive and non-judgmental environment that encourages employees to reach out for help without worrying about how it may look or whether it will have a negative impact on their career. Provide them with ways of obtaining the assistance they need, and promote discussion and support groups that can connect remote employees who may feel lonely and isolated from their colleagues. GTN Technical Staffing: Helping You Navigate Recruiting and Hiring in the Tech Sector GTN Technical Staffing provides creative and scalable staffing solutions encompassing SOW, staff augmentation, and direct hire placement for Fortune 2000 companies. Contact us today to learn how we can help you navigate an ever-changing tech talent landscape. Read More on Employee Wellness Remote Work: Wellness For Tech Employees Working From Home 4 Ways To Promote The Professional Growth Of Tech Employees Benefits of a Self-Insurance Insurance Plan

Continue Reading

Tips To Keep Your Remote Team Engaged In Their Tech Job

Keeping Your Workforce In The Game When They Work Out Of The Office When so much of teamwork involves a team actually working together, it can be an imposing challenge to keep a remote team engaged in their tech jobs. It is much easier for tech workers to stay motivated, encouraged, inspired, and productive when they spend their work hours surrounded by people who are all pulling together towards a common goal. But when colleagues are miles apart, communicate intermittently, and miss out on the day-to-day, face-to-face interactions that create connection and camaraderie, it takes leadership, planning, and effort to keep a remote team engaged. Here are four tips to help managers and leaders encourage tech worker engagement when working from home. Ease Up On The Zoom Meetings Companies often turn to Zoom and similar video conferencing platforms to communicate, hold meetings or host virtual happy hours in their efforts to replicate real-life employee interaction. But over time, many high tech workers begin to experience “Zoom fatigue.” According to Monster, 69 percent of employees reported experiencing burnout while working from home, and a lot of that burnout was due to too many virtual get-togethers. Rather than encouraging engagement, endless virtual meetings can make employees dread the next invitation that summons them to yet another hour of tedium. Reconsider how, why, and when you turn to Zoom meetings when other communication methods may be just as effective. For example, Slack is an excellent tool that can keep a team connected. If meetings or presentations are a must, try to keep them as short as possible. A recent Prezi/Harris survey recommends keeping Zoom meetings to an average length of 18 minutes as an effective way to keep remote teams engaged and not distracted. Also, consider “asynchronous” meetings that employees can tune into when it suits them. Create A Culture Of Connection Tech workers, like almost everyone, feed off the energy of those around them. When no one’s around, that energy may not be either. But a team’s spirit comes from more than just working together on a project or getting their paycheck from the same company. A team’s engagement and cohesion are products of their connection as human beings. While emails, Slack messages, or Zoom meetings may be no substitute for real, in-person, three-dimensional interaction, companies can take steps to create a culture of connection for employees who don’t get to hang out in the breakroom or grab drinks after work. Employers can create a sense of community among remote colleagues by encouraging them to share and discuss what’s going on in their lives other than their jobs. Establish safe spaces for them to discuss their families, plans for the weekend, small victories, or shared experiences. Offer encouragement and support and make it clear that you care about them as people, not just as employees. And never underestimate the power of appreciation. Making sure your employees know that you are aware of their accomplishments and contributions goes a long way to keeping employees engaged. Bring Out Their Competitive Spirit Most people love a little competition, and everyone loves winning. Harness your workforce’s competitive spirit by arranging virtual games and challenges. For instance, trivia contents are easy to set up using Zoom, Slack or similar platforms. Some professional trivia companies that usually host pub trivia contests also offer the same thing virtually for businesses. Colleagues can compete individually or in teams. A quick google search for “remote trivia company” delivers a plethora of websites to choose from that will fit your company culture. Wellness challenges have also proven to be an effective strategy for encouraging healthy habits and engaging employees in healthy competition. Keep Your Remote Team Engaged By Asking Them What They Need Effective communication is not a one-way street. While it is critical that companies keep their workforce informed about what’s going on, it is equally important that employees keep their employers abreast of their concerns or needs. Ask your tech employees for feedback on just about anything and everything, and make it clear that there are no stupid questions or wrong answers. When workers know that their employer is truly listening to them – and acting in response to what they say – they will be more loyal, committed, and engaged in their jobs. GTN Technical Staffing: Connecting Tech Workers and Tech Companies No Matter Where They Are No matter what role you play in the tech industry or the kind of position you’re looking for, GTN Technical Staffing can help connect you to the job you want. Contact us today to learn how we can help you navigate an ever-changing tech employment landscape. Read More on How to Keep Your Remote Team Engaged How to Ease Employee Concerns About Returning to Work 4 Boundaries Remote Tech Workers Need to Set Between Home and Work Time How to Stay Connected with Colleagues When Working From Home

Continue Reading

4 Boundaries Remote Tech Workers Need to Set Between Home and Work Time

It’s Not Business. It’s Not Personal. It’s Both When You’re Setting Boundaries as a Remote Tech Worker. When your office exists in the same place as your bedroom, kitchen, laundry room, and living room, the boundaries remote tech workers need to set between home and work time can be critical to maintaining a healthy work-life balance. For all of its upsides, remote work presents many challenges for tech workers who can unhealthily and unproductively blur the line between their personal and professional lives. Boundaries remote tech workers in Dallas, Phoenix, and across the nation establish between these two worlds serve many purposes. Such limits prevent their job obligations from following them 24 hours a day. They help employees make time for self-care and wellness. They ensure that spouses, kids, friends, and family get undivided attention and time needed for strong and healthy relationships. And boundaries also help keep employees focused, productive, and engaged during those hours they are on the clock. Here are four boundaries remote tech works should incorporate into their work from home lifestyle. Remote Tech Workers Boundaries: Have a Workplace to Go To Perhaps the best way to separate work from home is to do so physically. Whatever the size of your home or its layout, find one dedicated room or area that you claim as your workspace. Let those you live with know that when you’re there, you’re on the job and they should treat you as such. Hang a “Do-Not-Disturb” sign on the door or the back of your chair to remind folks to leave you alone. To the extent you can, keep your workspace away from where people frequently congregate, such as the kitchen. Set up a desk as you would in your office or cubicle and use the space exclusively for work. Have a Daily “Commute” You’d be hard-pressed to find a remote worker who misses being stuck in traffic or shoehorned into a crowded commuter train to get to and from their office. But for many people, that time allowed them to catch up on the news, listen to their favorite podcast, read a few pages in a novel, or just zone out. It was time that marked the transition from home to work and vice versa, allowing folks to psych up and wind down. Now that your commute consists of a staircase or a hallway, find a way to recreate that mental transition. Go for a brisk walk at the start of the day and when you clock out. Read or listen to things that bring you happiness, inspiration, or enrichment. Drive to a nearby coffee kiosk, grab a coffee and call a co-worker and chat casually about non-work stuff. Dress Up Or Dress Down. Just Get Dressed. When the work dress code changes from business professional to entirely your own, feel free to take advantage of it. If you prefer to work in sweats, shorts, yoga pants, hoodies, and t-shirts, do so. But you can make that all-important transition between work and home more real just by getting dressed in the morning rather than starting work in what you wore to bed. Of course, you’ll want to have a dress shirt or blouse at the ready for those Zoom meetings, even if you’re wearing shorts out of camera range. You don’t want to become another Zoom meeting wardrobe fail on the internet! Clock In and Clock Out Of all the boundaries remote tech workers establish, distinguishing between work hours and personal time can be the hardest. When technology allows superiors, coworkers, clients, and others to reach you 24/7, it is up to you to draw a line in the sand as to when and whether to read or respond. When there’s always more work to do and your desk and computer are only steps away, it requires discipline to keep your job from taking over your life. If your Dallas, Phoenix, or nationwide company expects you to work and be available during specific hours, do so. If you can work when you like, do so. But whenever that time you set for work ends, turn off your computer, silence your work email, text, or Slack alerts, and direct your attention to the rest of your life. And make sure to still take a lunch break! It can be tempting to work through lunch and eat at your desk, but just as you’re required to take a lunch break at the office, do so at home as well. That hour mental shut off will do more for your productivity than working through it. The Boundaries Remote Tech Workers Put Up Shouldn’t Include Limits on Their Opportunities Whether you are a talented tech professional working from home or you spend your days in an office, GTN Technical Staffing can help connect you to the job you want. Contact us today to learn how we can help you move your career forward, no matter where you work today. Read More on Technical Job Staffing How to Handle the “Desired Salary Question” Like a Boss Remote Work: Wellness for Tech Employees Working From Home Tips to Keep Your Remote Team Engaged in Their Tech Job

Continue Reading

How to Stay Connected With Colleagues When Working From Home

Stay Connected with Colleagues: Technology Can Keep Us Together While We’re Apart When your desk sits feet away from a coworker, when you say “Hi” to folks passing in the hallway, or when you spend time eating lunch together or grabbing after-work drinks, it’s easy to stay connected with colleagues. But when a workforce works from home, maintaining the team cohesion that is so essential to a company’s success and employees’ job satisfaction can be a daunting task. For all of the awfulness that 2020 has brought, we can at least be grateful that we live in a time when technology allows us to have ongoing communication and connection between employees who work miles or time zones apart. Leveraging that technology in positive and creative ways is the key to helping employees stay connected with colleagues. Here are five ways that businesses can keep their workers in Dallas, Phoenix, and nationwide together while they are apart. Virtual Coffee Breaks to Stay Connected with Colleagues For many folks, grabbing that first cup of coffee in the office breakroom is essential for starting their workday. But it’s not just the caffeine that helps people get going. It’s the interactions with coworkers who get to catch up while they’re brewing their java or toasting their bagel. Employers may want to set up a video chatroom link for employees to join in the morning before hunkering down for work. Those five or ten minutes spent shooting the breeze or sharing a laugh can be as energizing as a triple espresso. Virtual Happy Hours Relaxing with coworkers for after-work cocktails at the end of a long day or week is one of the many joys that the pandemic has put a damper on. But just because there’s no bartender pouring drinks doesn’t mean that colleagues can’t hang out and relax together over their favorite adult beverages. Whether it’s in a big Zoom group or just two coworkers getting together virtually, a virtual happy hour can create an excellent way for people to stay connected with colleagues in an informal, casual setting. Host Virtual Fitness and Wellness Classes Staying healthy and fit – both physically and mentally – has been one of the bigger challenges of working from home. But a workforce’s well-being directly impacts a company’s performance, and therefore, companies should take affirmative steps to encourage wellness. Host classes, seminars, and workshops focused on employee wellness. Bring in nutritionists, trainers, and mental health experts to discuss the challenges employees face. Offer fitness classes accessible to employees of all abilities, and host virtual cooking classes featuring healthy and nutritious meal ideas. Bring Out the Competitive Spirit Most folks love games, competition, and winning. That’s why “gamification” became such a business buzzword. Leverage a workforce’s competitive spirit by setting up virtual games and challenges. Trivia contents are popular and easy to put together using Zoom or Slack or similar platforms. Some professional trivia companies that usually host pub trivia contests have transitioned to doing the same thing virtually for businesses. Colleagues can compete individually or in teams. Wellness challenges have proven to be an effective strategy for encouraging healthy habits and reducing illness among employees. Establish and promote a variety of wellness and fitness challenges, with workers reporting their accomplishments and receiving rewards for participating or winning a given competition. These challenges can include: Walking/steps challenges Nutrition and diet challenges Mindfulness and mental health challenges Healthy habit challenges Sleep challenges Stay Connected With Colleagues by Connecting the Kids Grown-ups aren’t the only ones feeling isolated from their colleagues during the pandemic. Kids miss their schoolmates as they learn from home while their parents try to get work done in the next room. Many folks have had the embarrassing experience of an unwanted cameo appearance from one of their children during a videoconference or virtual meeting. Why not welcome them once in a while by connecting them with colleagues’ kids. If a meeting wraps up early, ask other participants if their kids want to chat with your kids and make new friends. GTN Technical Staffing Connects the Right Tech Employees With the Right Tech Companies No matter what role you play in the tech industry or the kind of position you’re looking for, GTN Technical Staffing in Dallas, Phoenix, and nationwide can help connect you to the job you want. Contact us today to learn how we can help you navigate an ever-changing tech employment landscape. Read More on Technical Job Recruiting How to Provide Interview Training to Hiring Managers What Are the Expected Trends in Tech Employee Relocation? 4 Boundaries Remote Tech Workers Need to Set Between Home and Work Time

Continue Reading

Remote Work: Wellness for Tech Employees Working from Home

Staying Healthy While Staying Home: Wellness for Tech Employees Of the multitude of challenges that tech companies in Dallas, Phoenix, and nationwide face as they navigate the current pandemic, ensuring wellness for tech employees may not seem like a high priority item. But maintaining the health and well-being of an IT company’s workforce, especially as more employees work from home, has a direct impact on the bottom line. Sick days and lost hours, reduced productivity, increased healthcare costs, and diminished employee job satisfaction – all of these can cost companies millions of dollars each year. For tech employees who work from home, staying mentally and physically fit can be a tall order. No more walking to the office or even just down the hallway to chat with coworkers. Lockdowns and social distancing limit gym access. A beckoning kitchen full of snacks. The stress of the pandemic and isolation from friends and colleagues increasing feelings of anxiety and depression. Notwithstanding these impediments, maintaining a sense of wellness for tech employees who work from home does not have to be difficult. Here are four ways companies can help their homebound IT professionals stay happy and healthy. Wellness for Tech Employees with a Remote Health and Well-Being Hub Leverage the tools and technology that facilitate remote work to encourage wellness activities and provide health resources to your workforce. Create a shared folder in Google Drive or establish a Slack channel focused on health and well-being. Provide links to exercise and nutrition videos and articles, share healthy recipes and exercise tips, and allow employees to post their own wellness ideas. Host Virtual Fitness and Wellness Classes Yes, we all experience “Zoom fatigue” from time to time. But that doesn’t change the reality that virtual meetings are essential to maintain connection and communication among a remote workforce. Host classes, seminars, and workshops focused on wellness for tech employees. Bring in nutritionists, trainers, and mental health experts to discuss the challenges employees face and provide tips and guidance for workers who may be struggling to stay fit and healthy. Offer fitness classes accessible to employees of all abilities, and host virtual cooking classes featuring nutritious meal ideas. Establish Fitness and Wellness Challenges Tech workers love games, competition, and winning. The “gamification” of wellness has proven to be an effective strategy for encouraging healthy habits and reducing illness among high tech employees. Establish and promote a variety of wellness and fitness challenges with workers reporting their accomplishments and receiving rewards for participating or winning a given competition. These challenges can include: Walking/step challenges Nutrition and diet challenges Mindfulness and mental health challenges Healthy habit challenges Sleep challenges Promote Mental Health Awareness and Provide Mental Health Resources Recent research reveals that the pandemic has taken a devastating toll on our collective mental health, with skyrocketing rates of depression, substance abuse, and related problems. Tech employees in Dallas and across the country who work from home need to recognize, understand, and acknowledge common emotional and psychological issues and adopt approaches to deal with them in a productive and healthy way. Emphasize the importance of mental health and create an environment that encourages employees to reach out for help without worrying about how it may look or whether seeking help will have a negative impact on their job. Provide them with resources for obtaining the help they need, and promote discussion and support groups that can connect remote employees who may feel lonely and isolated from the team. The U.S. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention has a terrific workplace health wellness resource center that employers and employees alike can use to reduce risks, improve quality of life, and promote wellness for tech employees working from home. Wellness for Tech Employees Starts with Getting the Right Job. GTN Technical Staffing Can Help No matter what role you play in the tech industry or the kind of position you’re looking for, GTN Technical Staffing can help connect you to the job you want. Contact us today to learn how we can help you navigate an ever-changing tech employment landscape. Read More on Technical Staffing How to Stay Connected With Colleagues When Working From Home How Will COVID-19 Shape Recruiting and Hiring in the Tech Sector 6 Tips for Acing a Video Technical Job Interview

Continue Reading

Make Your IT Career Recession-Proof the Proper Way

What You Need to Do to Ride the Storm Out Along with social distancing, mask-wearing, and hand-washing, making your career recession-proof is an essential element of protecting yourself during these uncertain times. Even before the pandemic, many economists saw a recession looming right around the corner. Now, aided by COVID-19, the recession has arrived with a vengeance, with the economy shedding millions of jobs a week, countless companies shutting their doors, and whole industries undergoing dramatic changes in the way they do business. Individuals in the IT industry are not immune from this economic fallout, even those who have yet to face furloughs or downsizing. But just as tech companies plan ahead for uncharted waters, so too should tech professionals. Planning means taking proactive, creative, and sometimes uncomfortable steps that can help you ride this storm out as well as any others the future may bring. Here are four things tech workers can do to make their IT career recession-proof the proper way. 1. Raise Your Profile to Keep Your Tech Career Recession-Proof Even if you consider yourself something of an introvert, as many IT folks do, now is not the time to keep to yourself. Instead, make this the time to build connections, increase your networking activity, and expand your circle of professional relationships. Engage with colleagues both within and outside of your current organization, either directly or through social media. Contribute to conversations and dialogue about relevant topics and issues. Participate in webinars and other professional education programs, including acting as a panelist, speaker, or presenter yourself. Make sure your LinkedIn profile and other aspects of your online presence put you in the best light and contain the most up-to-date information about your career and achievements. 2. Make Yourself Uncomfortable When things are going swimmingly, it’s understandable to want to stay in your comfort zone. Why rock the boat? But when the sailing becomes rough and you find yourself and your career battered by strong economic headwinds, getting out of your comfort zone may be the thing that keeps you afloat. (My apologies if all those sailing metaphors made you queasy.) Going outside your comfort zone can mean many things. You can expand your skill sets and explore opportunities that you may not have considered under normal circumstances. If you are out of work, use that found time to stay abreast of the latest developments in technology and the industry. Even outside of the professional context, trying bold, new activities that push and test you can give you the confidence to do the same in your career. 3. Be Agile and Open to Change People tend to be creatures of habit, even in the always-changing world of IT. But now the world itself has changed in ways that seemed almost unimaginable just a short time ago. You need to recognize that the way you’ve done things, the way all of your training and experience told you how to do your job, may not make as much sense anymore Tech companies are rapidly redefining roles and responsibilities. You need to understand what drives these changes and educate yourself as to the direction the industry is heading to keep your career recession-proof. That means building yourself a business mindset, alongside your well-developed technical one. Stay up to date on industry news and get a sense of the big picture that frames your corner of the IT world. 4. Be Ready for New Opportunities that Can Make Your Career Recession-Proof If you are fortunate enough to still be working at the IT position you had before the pandemic struck, you could just count your blessings, keep your head down, and do your job. But doing that will leave you vulnerable and unprepared if and when the economic fallout from the pandemic and the recession falls on you. Keep an eye on top IT recruiting sites, job boards, and company career pages to get a sense of who is hiring and what positions are open. Be prepared to pounce on new opportunities by keeping your resume fresh and ready to send at a moment’s notice. GTN Technical Staffing: Connecting the Right Tech Talent With the Right Tech Companies Whether you are looking for a permanent position or temporary, contract-based work in the tech industry, GTN Technical Staffing can help connect you to the job you want. In boom times, as well as times of economic uncertainty, we can help you navigate an ever-changing tech employment landscape. Contact us to speak with a tech recruiter today to learn more. Read More on Tech Job Tips Will Taking Contract Work Hurt My Career and Chances at a Corporate Job Later?  6 Tips for Acing a Video Technical Job Interview You Don’t Need a Recruiter

Continue Reading

Will Taking Contract Work Hurt My Career and Chances at a Corporate Job Later?

In the Gig Economy, Contract Work Isn’t the Red Flag It Used to Be As many tech workers spend months or years on temporary or contract gigs, whether out of economic necessity or personal choice, they may ask themselves, “Will contract work hurt my career?” Meaning, will doing what you need to do or prefer to do to make a living in the tech sector today damage your prospects for permanent, steady, corporate employment tomorrow? While every employer works differently and will take their own approach to evaluating a candidate’s work history, contract work is no longer the red flag it may have been in decades past. In reality, most folks making hiring decisions understand that the world has changed. Hiring managers and tech recruiters know that contract work in the “gig economy” is no longer an outlier or a sign that a candidate is somehow “less than” just because they work on a contract basis. That said, employers do want to see certain qualities in the people they hire for essential roles. Therefore, extended periods or multiple stints of contract work may be called into question. So, you ask, “will taking contract work hurt my career in the tech sector?” So long as you have a compelling and understandable explanation for working temporary or short-term gigs and can demonstrate talent, commitment, and consistency as through lines in your work history, such work should not hurt your chances for a long-term corporate job Contract Work Probably Won’t Hurt Your Career – Especially Now As is the case in almost every other sector of the economy, tech companies increasingly rely on contract workers as a core part of their business model rather than as a way to fill in talent gaps here and there. It isn’t unusual for a company to have more temp workers than full-time salaried staff. Google, for example, employs more than 130,000 people on a contract or temp basis. That exceeds its 123,000 full-time employees. Many companies even incorporate a contract work option in their job search function. Given that tech companies are in constant need of talented contract workers, they are unlikely to see such work as unusual when it appears on an applicant’s resume. They know that top-notch programmers and others take temp gigs because temporary contracts often pay extremely well while offering exciting or interesting challenges. Contract work may only become more acute given the instability and uncertainty caused by COVID-19. When long-term planning becomes more difficult, short-term hiring becomes a way to address immediate needs without making lengthy commitments that could backfire if economic conditions worsen. Companies Recognize the Appeal or Necessity of Contract Work Tech companies recognize that the economic conditions that gave rise to the “gig economy” play a significant role in why so many people in the industry take on temp work. But they also understand that other factors may make contract work either a necessity or an appealing option at certain junctures in a person’s career. Perhaps someone needed to take care of an ill family member and needed the flexibility that comes with a contract position. Maybe a new parent took some time away from their full-time career to raise their children but still wanted to keep their skills fresh and remain connected to their chosen profession. As employers are now more generally attuned to issues of work-life balance and career paths that don’t always follow a straight line, they also will get how contract work fits into these paradigms. “Will Contract Work Hurt My Career?” Not If You Can Prove You Have the Goods Historically, hiring managers saw “job hopping” as a potential sign that a candidate either lacked the commitment to stay in a job or had issues that led to their frequent and repeated departures from positions. But such transitions are simply part of the deal in contract work. Projects end. New opportunities arise. Moving from one gig to another is more just the ebb and flow of being a contractor than a sign of wanderlust or incompetence. When a tech interviewer asks about your time doing contract work, explain why you took the position and why you (or the project) moved on. With those issues out of the way, the focus will turn to the substantive work you performed and how the experiences contribute to your qualifications for the open position. Whether you are moving on from a term gig or a corporate job, you still need to show that you have the goods. The quality of temporary work you performed proves just as important as it would be in a long-term job, and the people you worked for or with on a contract project can still provide you with positive references. Finally, remember that in almost all circumstances, a period of contract work on your resume is better than a period of no work at all. Companies would rather hire someone who demonstrates a solid work ethic and commitment to building their skill set than someone who sat around for months doing nothing. GTN Technical Staffing: Connecting Talented Tech Workers to the Industry’s Best Jobs Whether you are looking for temporary, contract-based work or a permanent position in the tech industry, GTN Technical Staffing can help connect you to the job you want. We are a leading technical staffing solutions company, encompassing SOW, staff augmentation, and direct hiring placement for Fortune 2000 companies. Contact us today to learn how we can help you navigate an ever-changing tech employment landscape. Read More on Technical Job Hiring 6 Tips for Acing a Video Technical Job Interview Get Your Resume Noticed by Technical Hiring Managers Contract or Permanent Work? Here’s How to Decide

Continue Reading

Hot Coffee Here: A Look At Contract Java Developer Opportunities

contract java developer

Why Java?  As a source for companies and job seekers around the world, it doesn’t take much for us to keep tabs on the jobs that we see in the highest demand. One of the most consistently demanded jobs is contracted Java developers. It’s for this reason that we wanted to give you an inside look at why we believe this job is so highly sought after.  Stick with Java Coffee Java and computing Java actually do have something in common. Have you ever heard the old saying: if it ain’t broke, dont fix it?   In a world of fancy energy drinks, coffee is the classic that works for everyone. Java as a programming platform in many ways is universal. It may not be the fanciest, but it gets the job done. The greatest component for Java’s survival in the marketplace is its compatibility. It has been around so long due to its relative uniformity across all systems. While it may not be the most efficient type of programming, the coding language provides flexibility. Whether the code was written 25 years ago when the computing platform was first used or 25 min ago, it runs the same. In a world of rapidly changing technology, that kind of reliability is hard to find and hard to beat.  The Java Job Market Much of the opportunity we see for this skill is contract work, each job requiring something a little different. Most contract jobs span anywhere from 4-8 months in length. We find that the longer a programmer works with a client the greater the chance of rehire and follow up in the future. Being skilled in this department provides ample opportunity now and later down the road.  Being the Best Barista While Java often gets written off as the older language, updates are being made often so that it can do all the same things that other programming languages do. Staying up to date with each update is crucial. While many of the updates seem to be incremental, being fluent in each update can be a differentiator in contract work, as the people you are appealing to often are not as versed as you in the language.  Java Spring 5.0 Framework supports a wide variety of applications and could be helpful in solving several client scenarios. Spring focuses on the “plumbing” of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments. The innovation was brought about nearly 17  years ago, but recent changes have made it more user friendly and more helpful across a variety of platforms.  It would also be helpful to master the art of creating Android apps with Java. With mobile app downloads reaching nearly 20 billion a quarter, providing a piece of this market share to your clients would pose as a benefit. For more opportunities and other industry advice, visit us to discuss your future career today. Also, keep tabs on our job list, we are constantly updating it with your next project.   

Continue Reading

You Don’t Need a Recruiter

With today’s technology there are online job boards that allow you to search all day and night for a job that interests you. Many of them will even notify you when they think they have one you would be interested in. Sounds perfect, right? And in the technology world, no one needs to tell you how well a computer can think like a human. It’s okay to laugh at that last statement because you know better than anyone that even the smartest technology boils down to a series of numbers. While technology has taken over many aspects of our world, and continues to improve everyday, there are some things that just require human contact.  Computers need someone at the helm telling them what to do–it’s simply the way the world works. Relationships A recruiter will take time to understand what you want out of a career. Often recruiters know the right questions to ask to make you think through what you truly want.  You may think you want to shift gears completely and take on an entirely new occupation.  However, maybe your desire to change jobs has less to do with what you are doing and more to do with the company and culture you are doing it for.  The impact your work community has on your daily satisfaction can not be understated.  Disliking your boss or coworkers can easily translate into disliking everything about work, including your duties and responsibilities.  Consider finding a job at an organization that is more aligned with your values and character traits. This may be achievable by changing the size of the company you work for. While there is not a blanketing list of characteristics that every big company has, nor a list for smaller ones, there’s no doubt that the culture does change with size.  A recruiter, especially one who has been in the area and field for some time,  knows and understands the reputation of the companies around them.  Many companies do exit interviews. For many recruiters, the initial interview with you will cover a multitude of the same topics as the company exit interview.  For example, you may be asked why you left, what you liked about your position, compared to what you didn’t particularly enjoy. All of these, and many more, paint a picture of a company, providing the recruiter insider information on what working for that particular company looks like. What may not have worked out for one person, may be perfect for another. What a Recruiter Needs A great recruiter wants to understand what a candidate wants and needs for career satisfaction, compensation and what is needed to maintain balance within the candidate’s family. However, he can only understand what you allow him to. There is no possible way that being 100% transparent with your recruiter could hurt you. He wants both you and the client to be successful together, and the more he knows the better.  Even if you are just exploring your options and haven’t quite decided to jump ship yet tell him that. It may change the tone of the meeting to more of a pros and cons discussion. While if you are dead set on leaving, the recruiter won’t waste your time convincing you to stay or negotiate pay.  Recruiters are in the business of efficiency. The goal is to save you the time, energy, and hassle of the exhaustive process of job hunting as well as to have a sounding board for what your next career step could be. At the end of the day transparency helps them help you.  Reputation If you think of recruiting from a business perspective, a recruiter has done a job well done when they have a satisfied customer, the same as you.  The finished product is your satisfying career.  A word from our recruiters: “A great recruiter wants the candidate to achieve long-term success in the role he/she is placed, because that is how clients judge the recruiter. We want our clients to be happy. Happy employees do amazing work.” So you may think that you don’t need a recruiter or that you can explore your options all alone. And that may be true. But when something comes up at work that you don’t know how to handle, you go down the hall to the guy who is an expert because he knows how to handle it. When working on a project, everyone on the team has a task and a job. No one tries to handle the whole thing by themselves (or maybe they do and that’s why you want to leave).  Recruiters are in the business of you. They are on your team and they want to help you. So rely on your team. You could do it yourself, but you will likely have a better finished product, or in this case, career,  if you use your team.   

Continue Reading